The Life and Time of Lonny Quicke

The Life and Time of Lonny Quicke

By Author / Illustrator

Kirsty Applebaum

Genre

Fairy Tales & Folk Tales

Age range(s)

9+

Publisher

Nosy Crow Ltd

ISBN

9781788005241

Format

Paperback / softback

Published

06-05-2021

Synopsis

Q&A with Kirsty Applebaum


Lonny is a lifeling. He has the power to heal any living creature and bring it back from the dead. But he pays a price for this gift - by lengthening the creature's life, he shortens his own. So Lonny has to be careful, has to stay hidden in the forest. Because if people knew what he could do, Lonny would be left with no life at all... A brilliant novel from the author of The Middler about family, secrets and a terrible power.

Reviews

Jacqueline

Lonny lives in the forest, away from the town of Farstoke. He lives with his little brother Midge, his father and grandfather and is home-schooled. The reason is because he is a lifeling; someone who can literally give life to others, to animals or people. The cost of this, however, is at the expense of his own lifespan - each time he saves someone he gets older. The premise of the book is would you give your lifespan to save someone else?


The Life and Time of Lonny Quicke is an original and extremely thought-provoking book that will linger long after you have finished it. The tension is palpable, the ending almost inevitable, and yet the reader cannot see how it is going to happen. Whilst the story focuses on Lonny, it also looks at how others react to him and what they would do to save people they love. The idea is incredibly complex and difficult and yet it is written in such a way that it is easily accessible for children.


Everything else about this story - with the exception of Lonny - is entirely normal. The other children have mobile phones, real places like London are mentioned, the only difference is Lonny himself. And it makes you ask the question - what would I do if it was me?


This book, another triumph for Kirsty Appelbaum (though entirely different from with either of her other books), would engender so much discussion in an upper KS2 class. It is difficult subject matter but I keep wondering, what would I do for someone I loved?


272 pages / Reviewed by Jacqueline Harris, teacher

Suggested Reading Age 9+